First Lines: Trigger Warning

Neil Gaiman’s latest volume of collected short fictions and disturbances, Trigger Warning (table of contents), is a hoot. For this post, I was going to dump a load of links to you, but as I could mostly find links to readings of the work, I won’t. Take, for example, “Click-Clack the Rattlebag”, which is an excellent little story. A reading by Neil himself has been around for quite some time, and I’ve made several attempts to listen to it, but the things is: I can’t keep my focus on the story for ten minutes. So, if I’m not going to take the time to process all the things I’m sharing, why would I expect you to do it?

As always, with collections like this, you might come across things you’ve encountered before. In my case, that was “Truth is a Cave in the Black Mountains,” which I read for the third time (but still awesome), and “A Calendar of Tales,” which was an online social media thing, and contains some quite good stuff. The new-for-me-stuff that I really liked included “Nothing O’Clock” (a Doctor Who story, that still works for Doctor Who-noobs like me), “The Sleeper and the Spindle” (a mash-up of Snow-White and Cinderella), “The Thing About Cassandra” (in which a fictional girlfriend gets a little less fictional), “Jerusalem” (inspired by William Blake, pondering what would happen if you build Jerusalem in England’s green and pleasant land), and, finally, “Black Dog” (a glorious American Gods story, which makes me want to revisit that book).

As a bonus, I read “How the Marquis Got His Coat Back,” a Neverwhere story, that is published in Europe as a tiny little book. It’s quite nice as well.

Book read
Neil Gaiman — Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances
First line
Today I intended to begin to write (from “Making a Chair”)
Book read
Neil Gaiman — How the Marquis Got His Coat Back
First line
It was beautiful.